Ridge pushes for environmentally safe gas drilling

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Former Gov. Tom Ridge this afternoon called Marcellus Shale gas production a “transformative opportunity” for Pennsylvania during an appearance Downtown in his new role as a strategic adviser to an industry group.

Natural gas company reaches out to neighbors

WNEP-TV
The natural gas industry is booming in many parts of our area and one company is trying to educate the public with a community picnic held Saturday near Montrose. Cabot Oil and Gas has more than 100 gas wells in Susquehanna County and at Montrose Area high school, the company and other contractors brought in equipment, had demonstrations and more to show the community exactly what they do and how they do it.

Our commitment to the community

Lock Haven Express
Chances are by now you’ve heard of the Marcellus Shale. And if so, maybe you’re familiar with the once-in-a-generation kind of opportunity that the responsible development of the natural gas that resides within it presents for not only Clinton County and Pennsylvania, but our entire country and every single man, woman and child who lives here.

Making good on a promise; Halliburton plant creates jobs

Williamsport Sun-Gazette
When ground was broken last August on a cement mixing plant owned by Halliburton off Route 405 in Clinton Township, company officials promised they would bring jobs to this area. The company is making good on that promise, said Perry A. Harris, senior district manager for Halliburton’s northeast U.S. operations.

‘Marcellus multiplier’ could spark economic revival in Pennsylvania

Scranton Times-Tribune
At its peak, the Pennsylvania Railroad controlled more than 10,000 miles of rail line, employed more than 250,000 Americans, and had an annual budget that exceeded that of the federal government. And despite all that, it might not have even been the best railroad in the state.

Marcellus Shale drilling drives economic growth

Centre Daily Times
While still in its infancy, the environmentally responsible development of clean-burning natural gas from Pennsylvania’s portion of the Marcellus Shale formation continues to create tens of thousands of good-paying jobs and drive economic activity and growth during some of the most challenging economic conditions in decades.

Unemployment figures different in rural NEPA due to gas industry

Scranton Times-Tribune
In May, a Penn State University study funded by the natural gas industry said development in the Marcellus Shale region would create 88,000 jobs in 2010. With unemployment up in the state, Bradford County has bucked trends with an unemployment rate that has gone down in the last year. Other rural counties in the region have seen joblessness increase at rates much less than the state and more urban counties, such as Lackawanna and Luzerne.

NEPA schools preparing workers for jobs in gas-drilling industry

Scranton Times-Tribune
With the boom in Marcellus Shale natural gas development throughout the region, area educational institutions are growing to keep up with work force demands. New training, certification and degree programs are being created at local schools to ensure local job skills are tailored to white- and blue-collared job needs related to the natural gas drilling industry.

Pipe makers’ sales skyrocket along with area’s gas boom

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Natural gas drilling rigs are using thousands of tons of pipe and tubing products every day in the booming Marcellus shale region, experts said yesterday.

Gasland Documentary Blasted

WICZ-TV
A documentary portraying the negative effects of gas drilling is getting negative feedback. The film was recognized at the Sundance Film Festival but Pennsylvania’s department of environmental protection secretary John Hanger–who’s been criticized by environmental groups, says the documentary is fundamentally dishonest and full of propaganda.

Making the case for drilling in New York

Sayre Morning Times
Dr. Don Siegel said Thursday he is tired of all the hype. He is tired, he said, of seeing what he calls “an enormous amount of misinformation” about natural gas drilling, specifically hydraulic fracturing, being distributed and broadcast by the media. Siegel, a hydrogeology professor at Syracuse University, was part of a five-member panel who spoke at a news conference Thursday at the Holiday Inn Arena.

Expert: Anti-drilling claims full of hyperbole

Ithaca Journal
According to Syracuse University Earth Sciences professor Don Siegel, these concerns are more myth than reality. “This is the first environmental issue that I’ve thrown my hat into the ring on,” he said.

Jobs for Pa., clean air for everyone

Pottstown Mercury, Congressman Joe Pitts
As you are no doubt aware, the United State receives the majority of our oil from overseas sources. Unfortunately, we are dependent on volatile regions and despotic regimes for the petroleum that runs our cars. Just a few years ago it appeared that the United States would soon be dependent on foreign nations not only for oil, but also for natural gas.

Natural-gas drilling is tightly regulated in PA

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Sen. Mary Jo White
While the scale of Marcellus Shale drilling is new to Pennsylvania, we have had a robust oil and gas industry in the commonwealth for decades. Any comparisons to past industrial extraction, such as coal mining, which occurred before the enactment of environmental laws, are simply inaccurate.

Marcellus Shale ‘crop’ sustaining family farms

Wilkes-Barre Times Leader, LTE
As a farmer in the Marcellus Shale region, I have a different opinion on natural gas leasing and the effect on agriculture and the environment in Pennsylvania.

Project a gas

Scranton Times-Tribune, Editorial
A $500,000 upgrade of the historic rail yard in Fell Twp., which was built in 1825 to help ignite the region’s coal boom, is a good example of the region’s new gas industry’s ability to boost overall economic development and of the growing importance of rail freight to the region.

Move forward on Marcellus shale plans

Albany Times Union, LTE
Unquestionably, the technology is already in place that can prevent these incidents and minimize the surface impact of shale gas drilling. Industry practice has reduced the surface impact of well pads to two miles apart and recycles and reuses nearly 100 percent of produced water. New York almost certainly will require full disclosure of chemicals and closed loop systems that make spills extremely unlikely.

Rail yard dormant since King Coal’s demise revived by Shale

Scranton Times-Tribune
This is where Marcellus Shale succeeds King Coal. Traffic will resume next month at the historic Carbondale rail yard after Linde Corp., a Honesdale-based utility and heavy construction contractor, completes a $500,000 upgrade linked to the region’s emerging natural-gas industry.

Let US gas build US jobs

Scranton Times-Tribune, Editorial
In contrast, about 98 percent of all the natural gas consumed in the United States is produced here. Moreover, as demonstrated by the Marcellus Shale boom, the supply is abundant. Penn State geologists have estimated that the Marcellus Shale field alone contains more than 500 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas, whereas current national consumption is about 20 trillion cubic feet per year.

Natural gas could fuel job boom

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
In an otherwise antiquated Green Tree railyard, dozens of railcars move in from the Midwest, waiting to load thousands of tons of sand onto trucks to be transported to Marcellus Shale sites in bordering counties.

Hydraulic Fracturing is Environmentally Safe

Lehigh Express-Times
The Express-Times notes in a June 3 editorial (“Protect the river from floods, drilling”) that hydraulic fracturing — a critical energy production technology that has been safely deployed in Pennsylvania for more than 50 years — has never contaminated groundwater. That’s a fact confirmed by top environmental officials in Harrisburg and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Shale gas will change the world

Financial Times
Everybody’s favourite moment in The Graduate is when the film’s hero is cornered by one of his parents’ friends. The older man’s advice to Benjamin Braddock consists of just one word – “plastics”. Something similar keeps happening to me at international conferences. I will be minding my own business, when a delegate will get up with a gleam in his eye and announce portentously – “shale gas!”

Shale coalition president promotes drilling’s economic benefits

Wilkes Barre Times-Leader
SCRANTON – The president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition on Monday told regional community leaders that development of the Marcellus Shale not only will help the economy on a large scale, but it’s just as important to recognize the effects on the area business owners and the area job market.

Each gas well to use $4M of locally-produced materials

Scranton Times-Tribune
The state’s growing natural gas industry offers expanding industrial and employment opportunities in the region, the head of an industry trade group said Thursday.

Natural gas impacts discussed

Towanda Review
Some state representatives from around the Commonwealth got an idea of the tremendous impact the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has had on Bradford County during a public hearing in Ulster Thursday.

Marcellus shale creates jobs

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Jason Norris, of Dura-Bond Industries Inc. in Export, knows firsthand the economic impact of drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale formation.

Life on a Drilling Rig

WNEP-TV
Natural gas drilling is changing the landscape of the northern tier in many ways.

‘Silent majority’ is pro-drilling

Times Herald-Record
They call themselves the silent majority. They’re farmers and sportsmen, educators and entrepreneurs. And they want to drill for natural gas. Now.

Economic impact of Marcellus Shale extensive

Washington Observer-Reporter
The Marcellus Shale formation has had and will continue to have a profound impact on the economy of our county and our region. While some are concerned about the environmental considerations related to deep gas development, there is no question that the Marcellus Shale will benefit most of us greatly.

Leaders Discuss Impact Of Marcellus Shale Drilling

Drilling for natural gas in the so-called “Marcellus Shale” deposit is creating thousands of jobs and turning farmers into millionaires. But critics say it’s also scarring the land, creating noise and dirt and pitting neighbor against neighbor.

Marcellus Shale jobs no myth

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Letter to the Editor “Where Are All the Marcellus Shale Jobs?” that ran April 9 characterizes as “rather fantastical” the proposition that activities pursuant to the development of natural gas from the Marcellus are capable of generating thousands of jobs for Pennsylvanians.

New company says it can safely handle Marcellus wastewater

A new company formed at Pittsburgh’s Allegheny-Singer Research Institute believes it’s found an environmentally safe way to treat millions of gallons of wastewater generated by drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale formation.

200 turn out for Marcellus Shale forum

With the recession ravaging the nation’s economy, Kathryn Klaber has had a close-up seat for a boom of sorts.

Symposium covers wide range of issues

Bucknell University’s Institute for Public Policy’s symposium on the Marcellus Shale provided a forum for scientists, industry representatives, economic development specialists and government regulators to get together to discuss the wide ranging impacts natural gas development in the shale region can have on Pennsylvania.

Letter to the Editor: Editorial erred on gas drilling industry, tax

April 5’s editorial (“Arrogance hardly helps drillers’ goals”) echoes several claims that simply aren’t supported by the facts. Here, for your readers, are those facts.

Shale concerns overblown

The Marcellus Shale, which according to some geologists is the world’s second-largest natural-gas field, holds the potential to create hundreds of thousands of new jobs for Pennsylvanians – while reducing our dangerous dependence on foreign energy resources.