Are there plans to add a permanent pipeline for the drilling companies’ water supplies to come into the area or will the locals in shale areas have to hear the rumbling of water trucks forever?

Yes, pipelines can be used to transport water to a well pad and some operators are moving in this direction when logistically possible. The responsible development of natural gas from shale formations involves both the use of fresh water and the return of water from underground formations. Water is often transported by pipeline for its […]

When is the pipeline ready for operation?

The first step in pipeline construction is obtaining the appropriate permits and right of way (ROW) easements to construction the line. Upon completion, there are a number of tests conducted to ensure the structural integrity of the line before it goes into operation. These tests include x-raying the welds on the pipe to ensure mechanical […]

What happens to the brine?

The vast majority, upwards of 90 percent of flow-back water (brine) is recycled and reused for future well completion activities. When the water returns to the surface, operators can either treat the water at the wellsite and store it for future use, or transport the water to a centralized water treatment facility where it can […]

Is export, via ocean transport, a realistic possibility? What will it take to make that possible?

Yes. In fact, as of September 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy has approved four export facilities with 20 additional permits awaiting review and approval. For additional information on liquefied natural gas (LNG), visit the Center for Liquefied Natural Gas.

Where and how is the fracking solution disposed of?

According to the most recent data gathered by the Pa. DEP, Marcellus Shale producers are recycling and reusing more than 90 percent of the water that returns to the surface. The remaining water is disposed of in EPA-approved and permitted underground injection wells. MSC member companies have pioneered large-scale water recycling technologies over the past […]

How is water actually withdrawn from a stream?

With a hose, water is pumped out of an approved stream at a designated withdrawal point and then either transported by truck or conveyed through a water pipeline to a well location. Water withdrawal for natural gas drilling is one of Pennsylvania’s tightly regulated processes. Depending in which part of the Marcellus Shale play the […]

Where do you take your polluted water? How much do you store on site? How do you treat it at site and for final treatment?

Approximately 10 to 30 percent of the total water used in the hydraulic fracturing process returns to the surface as what is called flowback water. This remaining water, which contains naturally occurring elements as well as certain chemicals used during the extraction process, is captured and stored for treatment or disposal. Emerging technology allows operators […]

How much gas stays here in vs. being sent to other places?

Natural gas operators in Pennsylvania annually produce more than 198 billion cubic feet of natural gas. Pennsylvania consumes about 804 billion cubic feet of natural gas every year, so these levels satisfy 25 percent of the state’s annual demand. Natural gas from the Marcellus Shale is providing a wide array of economic and environmental benefits […]

Is there a central sourcing point for the industry?

In Pennsylvania, the best source of Marcellus Shale gas is in the western and north-central/northeastern portions of the state due to the depth, thickness and total organic content of the resource in those areas.

Are empty wells going to be used to pump in polluted oil byproducts?

Approximately 10 to 30 percent of the total water used in the hydraulic fracturing process returns to the surface as what is called flowback water. This remaining water, which contains naturally occurring elements is captured and stored within the formation itself. The flowback water that returns to the surface is treated and reused or sent […]