Annual Natural Gas Impact Tax Revenues to Top $219 Million

Annual revenues from Pa.’s natural gas impact tax are projected to top $219 million, according to the state’s nonpartisan Independent Fiscal Office. These projected revenues are $46 million higher than 2016 and push the total generated from the state’s tax on natural gas past $1.5 billion.

Here’s what they’re saying about natural gas impact tax revenues that have become “an important source of money for local governments”.

“Pa.’s shale gas impact fee revenue to rise $46 million this year, IFO reports”

“The increase means there will be more money to share among the communities that host shale gas wells, which split the bulk of the funds. Proceeds from the fees are also allocated to state environmental, infrastructure, emergency management and housing programs.” (1/31/18)

“Impact fee forecast shows increase for 2017”

“Pa.’s impact fee will bring in the most annually since 2014, according to a state estimate … The increase happened as Gov. Tom Wolf signaled again in recent weeks that he would seek a severance tax on the gas industry. ‘Additional and higher energy taxes jeopardize these local benefits and jobs, along with the significant cost savings that families are seeing in their natural gas and electricity,’ Spigelmyer said.” (2/1/18)

“Natural gas impact fee revenue expected to rise this year”

“Pa. is expected to bring in $46.1 million more this year from natural gas impact fees. … The IFO predicts the fees will raise $219.4 million — a nearly 27 percent increase from last year. … The fees have become an important source of money for local governments because 60 percent of the revenue stays in the regions where gas drilling occurs. The rest goes to various state agencies involved in regulating the industry and to the Marcellus Legacy Fund – which gets spread out around Pa.” (1/31/18)

“State projects drilling impact fee increase of $46 million”

“While the news was greeted as a positive indicator of the overall health of the shale gas business in Pa., the president of the MSC cautioned that now is not the time for Gov. Tom Wolf to push for a severance tax, which the governor has done for the last several years … [Dave Spigelmyer] said the impact fee provides ‘critical funding for community and environmental programs’ across the state and again cautioned against the state government enacting any other kind of severance tax against the industry.” (2/1/18)

“Pa. gas drilling fee revenue rebounded in 2017”

“Rebounding prices for natural gas and a growth in new wells exploring Pa.’s vast Marcellus Shale reservoir are fueling a recovery in fee revenue for state programs and county and municipal governments. The IFO projected Wednesday that impact fee collections for 2017 will be just above $219 million, $46 million more than 2016.” (2/1/18)

“IFO: Shale gas wells to produce $219.4M in impact fees for 2017”

“‘Pa.’s natural gas tax provides critical funding for community and environmental programs across the Commonwealth,’ said MSC President David Spigelmyer. ‘This report, along with strong support from local leaders, demonstrates the benefits and effectiveness of this tax, which will total nearly $1.5 billion since 2012. “Additional and higher energy taxes jeopardize these local benefits and jobs, along with the significant cost-savings that families are seeing in their natural gas and electricity costs.’” (2/2/18)

“Pa. shale gas wells to produce $219.4M in impact fees for 2017”

Tax revenue from Pa.’s unconventional natural gas wells for 2017 jumped 26.6% from 2016, buoyed by higher natural gas prices, and more newly-drilled wells, primarily in the Marcellus Shale, the state’s IFO projects. Last year, the impact fee is expected to produce $219.4 million, up $46.1 million from 2016, and the highest amount since 2014’s $223.50 million.” (2/2/18)

“State projects drilling impact fee increase of $46 million”

“The state has released projections for last year’s impact fees collected from shale gas drilling, and the figure is expected to be $46 million higher than in 2016. The money, which is disbursed in July to counties and municipalities across the state, can be used only for specific items, such as construction projects, road maintenance and upgrades, bridge repair, water and sewer repairs, and environmental programs including parks and recreation.” (2/1/18)


“Pa. Shale Impact Fees Likely Higher for 2017”

“Higher natural gas prices and more new wells last year are likely to help raise Pa. impact fee collections from shale gas producers for the first time in three years, according to the state’s IFO. The IFO expects impact fee collections for 2017 to be $219.4 million, or $46.1 million higher than 2016.” (2/1/18)

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